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fraud awareness

by: Westworld

February 2010
Shred Your Identity

Reduce your risk of becoming a victim of identity theft and other fraud-related crimes. Peoperly disposed of all documents with your personal information

Shred today

Papers, envelopes, address labels, and multi-media files that contain personal information, such as names, addresses, bank account numbers, Social Insurance Number, birth dates, drivers’ license numbers, employment information (i.e. offer letters, etc.)
Credit card applications and other financial applications that may contain personal information
Expired travel related documents, such as luggage tags, travel itineraries, used airline tickets, passports, travel visas, foreign identification cards and foreign driver licenses
Expired student ID cards, military ID, employee nametags
Credit checks, police checks and background checks on yourself, and other people such as employees, contractors, nannies immediately after evaluating the information

Shred every month

Reconciled credit card statements and receipts or cancelled cheques and debit receipts that are not needed for tax purposes or other long-term needs such as refunds or warranties.

Shred every year

Retirement and investment account statements, after they have been reconciled with your year-end statement
Monthly bank statements only after they have been reconciled with your year-end statement
Pay stubs, after being reconciled with your annual statement, your T4 or equivalents

Shred after eight years

Year-end bank statements that are not needed for tax purposes
Titles, contracts and deeds for sold properties
Documents previously needed for tax purposes
To ensure your valuable documents and keepsakes are safe, consider renting a safe deposit box or other secure means of protecting these items outside your home. Depending on your circumstances, a fireproof home safe may also be a suitable option.

Documents and records you should never shred

Appraisals and receipts for valuables (i.e. jewelry and artwork)
Income tax returns and related financial documentation
Securities and trade confirmations
Marriage, death, birth and divorce certificates
Wills
Power of attorney documents
Receipts or statements that indicate a loan or mortgage has been paid-in-full
Military service records
Insurance policies and claims
Year-end retirement and investment account statements and policies
College or high school diplomas, degrees and transcripts
Most current resume
The above documents may be shredded if the original owner has passed away and all matters with the estate have been finalized and closed.

Don’t consider shredding until they expire

Rental contracts and/or leases for current properties
Loan contracts, until paid-in-full and you receive an official acknowledgement of full payment
Home and vehicle maintenance records so they can be passed on to the next owner
Warranty documents for products you currently own
Membership documents (i.e. gyms, clubs and associations)
Information on the benefits package from current employer
Contracts for services (i.e. cell phone, electricity)
Pet records

Think twice before shredding any documents listed above if a legal conflict has arisen or may arise. For example, if you were involved in a vehicle collision, you should consider keeping all documents that relate to the incident in case of a lawsuit, since legal action can be initiated up to 10 years after an event occurs.

fraud awareness

by: Westworld

February 2010
email to a friend

Shred Your Identity

Reduce your risk of becoming a victim of identity theft and other fraud-related crimes. Peoperly disposed of all documents with your personal information

Shred today

Papers, envelopes, address labels, and multi-media files that contain personal information, such as names, addresses, bank account numbers, Social Insurance Number, birth dates, drivers’ license numbers, employment information (i.e. offer letters, etc.)
Credit card applications and other financial applications that may contain personal information
Expired travel related documents, such as luggage tags, travel itineraries, used airline tickets, passports, travel visas, foreign identification cards and foreign driver licenses
Expired student ID cards, military ID, employee nametags
Credit checks, police checks and background checks on yourself, and other people such as employees, contractors, nannies immediately after evaluating the information

Shred every month

Reconciled credit card statements and receipts or cancelled cheques and debit receipts that are not needed for tax purposes or other long-term needs such as refunds or warranties.

Shred every year

Retirement and investment account statements, after they have been reconciled with your year-end statement
Monthly bank statements only after they have been reconciled with your year-end statement
Pay stubs, after being reconciled with your annual statement, your T4 or equivalents

Shred after eight years

Year-end bank statements that are not needed for tax purposes
Titles, contracts and deeds for sold properties
Documents previously needed for tax purposes
To ensure your valuable documents and keepsakes are safe, consider renting a safe deposit box or other secure means of protecting these items outside your home. Depending on your circumstances, a fireproof home safe may also be a suitable option.

Documents and records you should never shred

Appraisals and receipts for valuables (i.e. jewelry and artwork)
Income tax returns and related financial documentation
Securities and trade confirmations
Marriage, death, birth and divorce certificates
Wills
Power of attorney documents
Receipts or statements that indicate a loan or mortgage has been paid-in-full
Military service records
Insurance policies and claims
Year-end retirement and investment account statements and policies
College or high school diplomas, degrees and transcripts
Most current resume
The above documents may be shredded if the original owner has passed away and all matters with the estate have been finalized and closed.

Don’t consider shredding until they expire

Rental contracts and/or leases for current properties
Loan contracts, until paid-in-full and you receive an official acknowledgement of full payment
Home and vehicle maintenance records so they can be passed on to the next owner
Warranty documents for products you currently own
Membership documents (i.e. gyms, clubs and associations)
Information on the benefits package from current employer
Contracts for services (i.e. cell phone, electricity)
Pet records

Think twice before shredding any documents listed above if a legal conflict has arisen or may arise. For example, if you were involved in a vehicle collision, you should consider keeping all documents that relate to the incident in case of a lawsuit, since legal action can be initiated up to 10 years after an event occurs.

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